Friday, July 1, 2022

Navy orders ships, aircraft ‘sortied’ to return to Hampton Roads

Ships are heavy-weather moored Sept. 12, 2018, to a safe haven pier at Naval Station Norfolk in preparation for Hurricane Florence. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Justin Wolpert/Released)
Ships are heavy-weather moored Sept. 12, 2018, to a safe haven pier at Naval Station Norfolk in preparation for Hurricane Florence. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Justin Wolpert/Released)

Nearly 30 ships and 128 aircraft will return to the Hampton Roads area starting Saturday and will continue to return to homeport over the next several days, according to the Navy.

Aircraft will make their way back to Hampton Roads bases and surface ships will start to return Sunday.

The return plan for Norfolk-based aircraft will give priority to rotary wing assets to allow for additional land-based rotary wing Defense Support to Civilian Authorities support, if requested, the Navy said.

The decision to return naval assets to their homeport follows thorough inspections of port and airfield prior to opening for operations.

While most ships are making plans to return, USS Kearsarge (LHD 3) and USS Arlington (LPD 24) will remain underway prepared to provide DSCA, if requested through U.S. Northern Command, according to the Navy.

On Sept. 10, Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command ordered all Navy ships and flyable aircraft in the Hampton Roads area to sortie ahead of Hurricane Florence.

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John Mangalonzohttp://wydaily.com
John Mangalonzo (john@localdailymedia.com) is the managing editor of Local Voice Media’s Virginia papers – WYDaily (Williamsburg), Southside Daily (Virginia Beach) and HNNDaily (Hampton-Newport News). Before coming to Local Voice, John was the senior content editor of The Bellingham Herald, a McClatchy newspaper in Washington state. Previously, he served as city editor/content strategist for USA Today Network newsrooms in St. George and Cedar City, Utah. John started his professional journalism career shortly after graduating from Lyceum of The Philippines University in 1990. As a rookie reporter for a national newspaper in Manila that year, John was assigned to cover four of the most dangerous cities in Metro Manila. Later that year, John was transferred to cover the Philippine National Police and Armed Forces of the Philippines. He spent the latter part of 1990 to early 1992 embedded with troopers in the southern Philippines as they fought with communist rebels and Muslim extremists. His U.S. journalism career includes reporting and editing stints for newspapers and other media outlets in New York City, California, Texas, Iowa, Utah, Colorado and Washington state.

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