Friday, August 19, 2022

Scammers are out in force exploiting your generosity toward veterans. Here’s what to look out for

There are several ways to make sure your donations go to a legitimate charity rather than a greedy scam artist trying to use the cachet of veterans and military families to cash in. (WYDaily file/Courtesy of Unsplash)
There are several ways to make sure your donations go to a legitimate charity rather than a greedy scam artist trying to use the cachet of veterans and military families to cash in. (WYDaily file/Courtesy of Unsplash)

This year has been challenging for most, but all indications are people are still responding generously to calls from legitimate charities support the nation’s veterans.

However, there are still many out there who will take advantage of people’s generosity when it comes to veterans and exploit the one day the men and women who have served in the armed forces are honored.

Veterans Day is Wednesday.

The Federal Trade Commission emphasizes that not all charities are legitimate – “some are sham operators whose only purpose is to make money for themselves. Others use paid fundraisers whose fees eat up most of a donation, so very little of it is shared with those in need.”

According to the AARP, frauds include seeking donations for fake charities claiming to serve veterans (always research before giving); targeting veterans with fake employment opportunities (it’s a scam if you have to pay to get the job or provide sensitive personal information); and offers of free cash from little-known government grant programs (the federal government doesn’t hand out grants to individuals).

There are several ways to make sure your donations go to a legitimate charity rather than a greedy scam artist trying to use the cachet of veterans and military families to cash in.

Here are some tips from the FTC:

  • Recognize that the words “veterans” or “military families” in an organization’s name don’t necessarily mean that veterans or the families of active-duty personnel will benefit from the money you are donating. The U.S. Department of Defense doesn’t endorse any charity, but recommends this source of information about military relief societies.
  • Donate to charities with a track record and a history. Scam artists follow the headlines and charities that spring up literally overnight in connection with military conflicts and related news stories may disappear just as quickly – with your donation funding their next move. In many cases, those “instant charities” don’t have the infrastructure to get donated money or products to the right place.
  • Trust your gut – and check your records if you have any doubt about whether you’ve made a pledge or a contribution. Callers may try to trick you by thanking you for a pledge you didn’t make. If you don’t remember making the donation or don’t have a record of your pledge, resist the pressure to give.
  • Check out an organization before donating any money. Some phony charities use names, seals, and logos that look or sound like those of respected, legitimate organizations – or they may claim veteran status themselves as a way to gain your trust. You may see a small difference in the name of the charity from the one you mean to deal with; in that case, call the organization you know to be legitimate and check it out.
  • Don’t be shy about asking who wants your money. Some charities hire professional fundraisers for large-scale mailings, telephone drives, and other solicitations, rather than use their own staff or volunteers. They use a portion of the donations to pay the fundraiser’s fees. If you’re solicited for a donation, ask if the caller is a paid fundraiser, who they work for, and the percentage of your donation that will go to the charity and to the fundraiser. If you don’t get a clear answer – or if you don’t like the answer you get – consider donating to a different organization.
  • Call the office that regulates charitable organizations and charitable solicitations to see whether the charity or fundraising organization has to be registered in your state. If so, check to make sure that the company you’re talking to is registered. For a list of state offices, visit the National Association of State Charity Officials. The organization also can verify how much of each donation goes to the charity, and how much goes to fundraising and management expenses. You also can check out charities with the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving AllianceCharity NavigatorCharity Watch, and GuideStar.
  • Do not send or give cash donations. Cash can be lost or stolen. For security and tax record purposes, it’s best to pay by check – made payable to the charity, not the solicitor. If you’re thinking about giving online, look for indicators that the site is secure, like a lock icon on the browser’s status bar or a URL for a website that begins “https:” (the “s” stands for “secure”). Unfortunately, no indicator is foolproof; some fraudulent sites have forged security icons. If you’re not confident you’re dealing with a legitimate site, consider donating elsewhere.
  • Ask for a receipt that shows the amount of your contribution, and that it is tax deductible.
  • Be cautious of promises of guaranteed sweepstakes winnings in exchange for a contribution. According to U.S. law, you never have to give a donation to be eligible to win a sweepstakes.

If you think an organization may be making misleading solicitations or may not be operating for charitable purposes, contact your state Attorney General or your local consumer protection agency. You can get the phone numbers for these organizations in your phone book, through directory assistance, or through Web directories.

Or you may file a complaint with the FTC.

Also, you can visit the AARP Fraud Watch Network by clicking here or call the AARP Fraud Watch Network Helpline at 877-908-3360 to report a scam or get help if you’ve fallen victim.

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John Mangalonzohttp://wydaily.com
John Mangalonzo (john@localdailymedia.com) is the managing editor of Local Voice Media’s Virginia papers – WYDaily (Williamsburg), Southside Daily (Virginia Beach) and HNNDaily (Hampton-Newport News). Before coming to Local Voice, John was the senior content editor of The Bellingham Herald, a McClatchy newspaper in Washington state. Previously, he served as city editor/content strategist for USA Today Network newsrooms in St. George and Cedar City, Utah. John started his professional journalism career shortly after graduating from Lyceum of The Philippines University in 1990. As a rookie reporter for a national newspaper in Manila that year, John was assigned to cover four of the most dangerous cities in Metro Manila. Later that year, John was transferred to cover the Philippine National Police and Armed Forces of the Philippines. He spent the latter part of 1990 to early 1992 embedded with troopers in the southern Philippines as they fought with communist rebels and Muslim extremists. His U.S. journalism career includes reporting and editing stints for newspapers and other media outlets in New York City, California, Texas, Iowa, Utah, Colorado and Washington state.

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