Monday, August 8, 2022

Some federal court cases, including on the Peninsula, postponed due to coronavirus outbreak

(WYDaily file photo/Courtesy of Pixabay)
(WYDaily file photo/Courtesy of Pixabay)

The U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia postponed misdemeanor, traffic and petty offense cases in response to the coronavirus outbreak.

The eastern district covers the entire Peninsula.

The district also has suspended all non-case related events, tours and other gatherings in courthouses, including naturalization ceremonies.

Chief Judge Mark S. Davis said in a special order there have been reports of people scheduled to appear in court who are under self-quarantine based on possible exposure.

According to the order, the cases will be continued through April 30. New dates will be reset without the need to file any motions – the delays caused by the continuances will be excluded from requirements of the Speedy Trial Act.

“In exceptional circumstances, any judge in the Court may make a case-specific exception to the District-wide continuance if the parties and counsel agree that there is a valid case-specific reason to proceed with a hearing,” according to the order.

No changes have been made to civil or criminal felony dockets. The courthouses and clerks’ offices remain open.

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John Mangalonzohttp://wydaily.com
John Mangalonzo (john@localdailymedia.com) is the managing editor of Local Voice Media’s Virginia papers – WYDaily (Williamsburg), Southside Daily (Virginia Beach) and HNNDaily (Hampton-Newport News). Before coming to Local Voice, John was the senior content editor of The Bellingham Herald, a McClatchy newspaper in Washington state. Previously, he served as city editor/content strategist for USA Today Network newsrooms in St. George and Cedar City, Utah. John started his professional journalism career shortly after graduating from Lyceum of The Philippines University in 1990. As a rookie reporter for a national newspaper in Manila that year, John was assigned to cover four of the most dangerous cities in Metro Manila. Later that year, John was transferred to cover the Philippine National Police and Armed Forces of the Philippines. He spent the latter part of 1990 to early 1992 embedded with troopers in the southern Philippines as they fought with communist rebels and Muslim extremists. His U.S. journalism career includes reporting and editing stints for newspapers and other media outlets in New York City, California, Texas, Iowa, Utah, Colorado and Washington state.

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