Tuesday, August 9, 2022

This is what Pantheon, the new ride at Busch Gardens, might look like

On Tuesday, Busch Gardens released a rendering of Pantheon image on Twitter showing a yellowish track with a car full of riders streaking through the trees. (WYDaily/Courtesy of Busch Gardens Williamsburg Twitter)
On Tuesday, Busch Gardens released a rendering of Pantheon image on Twitter showing a yellowish track with a car full of riders streaking through the trees. (WYDaily/Courtesy of Busch Gardens Williamsburg Twitter)

A previously-unseen artist’s rendering of Busch Gardens Williamsburg’s new roller coaster, Pantheon, gives a glimpse into what the ride could look like.

On Tuesday, Busch Gardens released the image on Twitter showing a yellowish track with a car full of riders streaking through the trees.

In the background, cloud-like Roman gods overlook the riders on the track. 

The tweet reads “2020 is going to be MONUMENTAL.”

Pantheon was unveiled July 30 as a record-breaking ride for North America.

The coaster will be located in the Festa Italia village and have 15 airtime hills, a 95-degree drop, two inversions and a top speed of 72.5 mph. It will have two trains with 20 riders per train.

The Intamin Worldwide-made coaster touts itself as North America’s fastest multi-launch coaster.

The ride’s special features, such as the drop and forward and backward launches, are themed after five Roman gods, including Pluto, Mercury, Neptune, Jupiter and Minerva.

Launch speeds include:

  • Launch 1: 36 mph
  • Launch 2: 50 mph
  • Launch 2 (backward): 61 mph
  • Launch 3: 67 mph

The track will be 3,328 feet long and the ride will last two minutes.

Sarah Fearing
Sarah Fearing is the Assistant Editor at WYDaily. Sarah was born in the state of Maine, grew up along the coast, and attended college at the University of Maine at Orono. Sarah left Maine in October 2015 when she was offered a job at a newspaper in West Point, Va. Courts, crime, public safety and civil rights are among Sarah’s favorite topics to cover. She currently covers those topics in Williamsburg, James City County and York County. Sarah has been recognized by other news organizations, state agencies and civic groups for her coverage of a failing fire-rescue system, an aging agriculture industry and lack of oversight in horse rescue groups. In her free time, Sarah enjoys lazing around with her two cats, Salazar and Ruth, drinking copious amounts of coffee and driving places in her white truck.

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