Monday, May 23, 2022

Growing requests for county’s speed trailer prompts new technology in neighborhoods

The York-Poquoson Sheriff’s Office has purchased two electronic speed signs and data-gathering devices to install in county neighborhoods. (WYDaily/Courtesy of YPSO)
The York-Poquoson Sheriff’s Office has purchased two electronic speed signs and data-gathering devices to install in county neighborhoods. (WYDaily/Courtesy of YPSO)

An influx of reports of speeding cars in York County neighborhoods has prompted local law enforcement to invest in new technology to curb the issue.

The York-Poquoson Sheriff’s Office has bought two electronic speed signs and data-gathering devices to install in county neighborhoods, department spokesman Capt. Dennis Ivey said.

“We’re finding there are more and more speeding complaints,” Ivey said. “Sheriff (Danny) Diggs is very concerned about the safety in these neighborhoods.”

The digital signs were purchased for about $2,500 each — “a good bang for the buck,” Ivey said — in response to an increasing demand for the county’s speed camera trailer.

The sheriff’s office only has one speed trailer — and is “significantly” more expensive than the speed signs — so the sheriff’s office decided to meet the demand with new equipment.

“You need to hook the trailer up to a truck and tow it places,” Ivey said, adding the trailers aren’t as “user-friendly.” “It takes more than just putting it up on a pole like these.”

The new speed signs are removable, so the sheriff’s office can move them to different neighborhoods as-needed, Ivey said. The speed signs will be placed in certain locations based on deputy patrol reports, complaints from residents and the amount of traffic in an area.

So far, the sheriff’s office has put one speed sign in Queens Lake, Edgehill and Lakeside Drive. The department has not yet used the other sign that was purchased.

While the cameras are a lower-cost option compared to buying another speed trailer, they can do some things the trailer cannot: they track traffic numbers and assess the speed of different vehicles.

That technology will help the sheriff’s office determine where people are actually speeding and develop ways to enforce existing speed limits, Ivey said.

“It’s not being used to take a picture and send anyone a ticket,” Ivey noted. “This is an awareness and data-gathering device.”

Sarah Fearing
Sarah Fearing is the Assistant Editor at WYDaily. Sarah was born in the state of Maine, grew up along the coast, and attended college at the University of Maine at Orono. Sarah left Maine in October 2015 when she was offered a job at a newspaper in West Point, Va. Courts, crime, public safety and civil rights are among Sarah’s favorite topics to cover. She currently covers those topics in Williamsburg, James City County and York County. Sarah has been recognized by other news organizations, state agencies and civic groups for her coverage of a failing fire-rescue system, an aging agriculture industry and lack of oversight in horse rescue groups. In her free time, Sarah enjoys lazing around with her two cats, Salazar and Ruth, drinking copious amounts of coffee and driving places in her white truck.

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