Tuesday, October 4, 2022

Jamestown Unearthed: Man journeys from England to Jamestown to bring Gov. Yeardley back to life

John White (left) performs as Sir George Yeardley on Saturday, April 20, 2019 at the Jamestown Memorial Church. In the background is Bryan Austin as John Pory. Austin also interprets as James Madison at Colonial Williamsburg (WYDaily/Courtesy of Jamestown Rediscovery (Preservation Virginia))
John White (left) performs as Sir George Yeardley on Saturday, April 20, 2019 at the Jamestown Memorial Church. In the background is Bryan Austin as John Pory. Austin also interprets as James Madison at Colonial Williamsburg (WYDaily/Courtesy of Jamestown Rediscovery (Preservation Virginia))

On a recent Saturday afternoon, Sir George Yeardley was alive and well, his voice and English accent echoing throughout Jamestown’s Memorial Church as more than 50 camera-donning “colonists” intently listened.

It was early 1619 and Yeardley, the newly-appointed lord governor of the Jamestown colony, carried good news: He had been knighted by England’s king before sailing back to the colony, and planned several reforms in the wake of difficulties under the previous governor.

Yeardley declared settlers would be given tracts of land, and the first representative government — known as the general assembly — would soon be formed.

As a strong wind whipped up spray from the river outside the church, the Jamestown “colonists” shouted “Huzzah!”

Four days later on Wednesday, it was 1608. The same man with the booming English voice sat within the Jamestown Archaearium, carrying 17th-century medical tools and drinking Coca Cola from a pewter tankard as doctor Walter Russell, the man who saved John Smith’s life.

“And if you do survive, it is because of my expertise as a surgeon,” said the man acting as Russell, explaining an amputation in gruesome detail. “If, however, you be gathered unto God and die, then it is the will of God.”

In Jamestown, John White, 60, is Yeardley. On other days, he is Russell.

Elsewhere, White is powerful King Henry VIII, a medieval monk, executioner and about 30 other characters.

While some interpreters at Jamestown feign their English accents to fit their 17th-century roles, White does not. He is a resident of the Royal Town of Sutton Coldfield, England.

White is a 30-year veteran of England’s West Midlands Police, a father of two grown children and the only authorized costumed performer allowed within the royal family’s Windsor Castle.

White performs in houses, museums and theaters on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, and recently traveled to the United States with his wife, Denise, this month to be Yeardley in Jamestown Rediscovery’s 1619 programming.

John White, 60, holds programming as doctor Walter Russell, a man who is credited with saving the life of John Smith. (WYDaily/Sarah Fearing)
John White, 60, holds programming as doctor Walter Russell, a man who is credited with saving the life of John Smith. (WYDaily/Sarah Fearing)

Love of history

As a schoolboy, White hoped to become an actor.

Despite having a spot at drama school, “family and financial reasons” prevented White from realizing his dream at the time. Instead, he became a police officer, which eventually allowed him to go to university, where he received an honours degree in history and war studies and a master’s in heritage management.

He also has a postgraduate certificate in education and was a Fulbright Fellow at the University of South Carolina.

“What I wanted to do was to achieve sufficient academic standing to make myself, if you like, respectable in the world of historical interpretation,” White said.

While history has been a lifelong passion for White, dressing up as historical figures began when his son was about 8 years old and enrolled as a drummer boy in a reenactment group.

His son and daughter are now 33 and 27 years old, respectively.

As parents, White and his wife couldn’t stand by in “modern” clothes; instead, they wore costumes to blend in.

“I thought, well, if I’m going to dress up as somebody, I want to have a story rather than just being there standing around,” he said.

White retired from the police force in 2008 and decided to pursue historical interpretation full time, although he had been doing some performing before his retirement.

“You have to, I believe, give your audience the opportunity to ask questions because there will be lots of things they do not have a clue about,” White said, adding that there’s a balance between comedy and history in character interpretation, much of which is improvisation. “That is all down to lots and lots of reading and having a very retentive memory.”

John White (right) performs as Sir George Yeardley on Saturday, April 20, 2019 at the Jamestown Memorial Church. Willie Balderson, Jamestown Rediscovery’s director of education and interpretation, is on the left. (WYDaily/Courtesy of Jamestown Rediscovery (Preservation Virginia))
John White (right) performs as Sir George Yeardley on Saturday, April 20, 2019 at the Jamestown Memorial Church. Willie Balderson, Jamestown Rediscovery’s director of education and interpretation, is on the left. (WYDaily/Courtesy of Jamestown Rediscovery (Preservation Virginia))

Connecting with the U.S.

White and his family first traveled to the states to go to Disneyland. After that trip, White came to South Carolina through the Fulbright Program in 1998, visiting Williamsburg during a family road trip.

“It was like stepping back in history,” he said. “It was a playground. It was fantastic. It was seventh heaven.”

The family returned numerous times, which is when Willie Balderson found White. At the time, Balderson — now Jamestown Rediscovery’s director of education and interpretation — was working for Colonial Williamsburg.

Balderson said he works to arrange work in America for White each year, and has since around 2007.

Balderson set White up with some contracted work with Colonial Williamsburg and has since been his “unofficial agent” stateside, Balderson said.

John White as King Henry VIII. (WYDaily/Courtesy of John White)
John White as King Henry VIII. (WYDaily/Courtesy of John White)

Henry VIII

White’s favorite act is Henry VIII because of the king’s long-standing impact on English politics and churches.

White is a “really, unbelievably distant” cousin to Henry the VIII, he claims, and bears some physical resemblance.

Henry VIII is White’s most popular character, and he will perform as the king at Agecroft Hall in Richmond May 1.

In July, White will return to Jamestown for additional programming celebrating the 400th anniversary of the first meeting of the first representative assembly at Jamestown.

And, in the years to come, White has no plans to retire.

“I laughingly say to my wife that I suspect I will die in-harness,” he said.

Sarah Fearing
Sarah Fearing is the Assistant Editor at WYDaily. Sarah was born in the state of Maine, grew up along the coast, and attended college at the University of Maine at Orono. Sarah left Maine in October 2015 when she was offered a job at a newspaper in West Point, Va. Courts, crime, public safety and civil rights are among Sarah’s favorite topics to cover. She currently covers those topics in Williamsburg, James City County and York County. Sarah has been recognized by other news organizations, state agencies and civic groups for her coverage of a failing fire-rescue system, an aging agriculture industry and lack of oversight in horse rescue groups. In her free time, Sarah enjoys lazing around with her two cats, Salazar and Ruth, drinking copious amounts of coffee and driving places in her white truck.

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