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Wednesday, May 29, 2024

Don’t be a turkey — deep frying your bird can be dangerous. Here’s how to do it right

Deep frying a turkey is serious business (Southside Daily photo/Taken by Vicky Wasik)
Deep frying a turkey is serious business (WYDaily photo/Taken by Vicky Wasik)

Every year deep-fryer fires are responsible for five deaths, 60 injuries, the destruction of 900 homes, and more than $15-million in property damage, according to the National Fire Protection Association.

Below are safety tips from Butterball and State Farm on how to safely deep fry your turkey.

Deep-frying indoors

Using an electric fryer indoors involves high temperatures and dangers, so be sure to follow these instructions:

  1. Completely thaw your turkey, or use a fresh turkey.
  2. Take the wrapper off the turkey, and remove and discard the neck and giblets.
  3. Add oil to the fryer, but do not exceed the maximum fill line. Preheat oil in the fryer to 375° F.
  4. While the oil is heating, pat the turkey dry with paper towels and prepare your turkey with any seasonings, marinades, or injected flavors.
  5. Once the oil is heated, slowly lower the turkey into the fryer.
  6. Set the timer and cook the turkey about 3 to 4 minutes per pound.
  7. Cook all dark meat to an internal temperature of 175° F to 180° F, and all white meat to an internal temperature of 165° F to 170° F.
  8. When the turkey is done, slowly lift it from the pot and place it in a pan to drain.
  9. Let the turkey stand for 20 minutes before removing it from the rack or basket to carve.

Deep-frying outdoors

Although you’re outdoors, using a propane deep fryer can be very dangerous. Never leave your deep fryer unattended and follow these instructions:

  1. To start, take the wrapper off turkey, and remove and discard the neck and giblets.
  2. Deep-fry your turkey outside on a flat surface, far away from homes, garages, wooden decks, etc.
  3. To determine how much oil is needed for frying, place the thawed turkey in the fryer basket and place it in the fryer. Add water until the top of the turkey is barely covered. Remove the turkey, allowing the water to drain from the turkey back into the fryer. Measure and mark the water line, and use that line as a guide when adding oil to the propane fryer.
  4. Pat the turkey dry with paper towels.
  5. Add oil to the fryer, based on the water line.
  6. Preheat oil to 375° F.
  7. While the oil is heating, prepare your turkey with any seasonings, marinades, or injected flavors.
  8. When the oil is hot, turn the burner off and slowly lower the turkey into the hot oil. Slowly lowering the basket helps prevent the oil from bubbling over. Turn the burner back on.
  9. Cook the turkey 3 to 4 minutes per pound.
  10. The turkey is done when the dark meat is at an internal temperature of 180° F and all white meat is at an internal temperature of 165° F to 170° F.
  11. When the turkey is done, slowly lift it from the pot and place it in a pan to drain.
  12. Let the turkey stand for 20 minutes before removing it from the rack or basket.
John Mangalonzo
John Mangalonzohttp://wydaily.com
John Mangalonzo (john@localdailymedia.com) is the managing editor of Local Voice Media’s Virginia papers – WYDaily (Williamsburg), Southside Daily (Virginia Beach) and HNNDaily (Hampton-Newport News). Before coming to Local Voice, John was the senior content editor of The Bellingham Herald, a McClatchy newspaper in Washington state. Previously, he served as city editor/content strategist for USA Today Network newsrooms in St. George and Cedar City, Utah. John started his professional journalism career shortly after graduating from Lyceum of The Philippines University in 1990. As a rookie reporter for a national newspaper in Manila that year, John was assigned to cover four of the most dangerous cities in Metro Manila. Later that year, John was transferred to cover the Philippine National Police and Armed Forces of the Philippines. He spent the latter part of 1990 to early 1992 embedded with troopers in the southern Philippines as they fought with communist rebels and Muslim extremists. His U.S. journalism career includes reporting and editing stints for newspapers and other media outlets in New York City, California, Texas, Iowa, Utah, Colorado and Washington state.

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