Tuesday, July 5, 2022

This film details changes in the environment, how it affects people. Here’s where you can see it for free

For decades, James Balog has focused his camera lens on the relationship between people and nature, becoming a major voice in the climate change conversation. (Southside Daily photo/Courtesy Daniel Wright/Earth Vision Film)
For decades, James Balog has focused his camera lens on the relationship between people and nature, becoming a major voice in the climate change conversation. (Southside Daily photo/Courtesy Daniel Wright/Earth Vision Film)

VIRGINIA BEACH — The Chesapeake Bay Foundation will present the Hampton Roads premiere of the documentary “The Human Element” with renowned photographer James Balog.

The showing will be on Oct. 24. The free premiere of the film and discussion runs from at 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Sandler Center for the Performing Arts, 201 Market St.

The film, partially shot in Hampton Roads, shows in dramatic detail how changes in the environment are affecting the lives of everyday Americans, according to a news release from CBF.

The screening will immediately be followed by a community conversation on sea level rise with Balog, CBF President William C. Baker and Ann Phillips, special assistant to the governor for Coastal Adaptation.

“James Balog caught the world’s attention when his work for National Geographic and ‘Chasing Ice’ showed us all how climate change is shrinking glaciers. Now he has come to the front lines of sea level rise on the Chesapeake Bay. It’s a must see for everyone in Hampton Roads,” Baker said. “And in addition, many of the actions being taken to reduce pollution in the Chesapeake Bay will also sequester carbon and help slow climate change.”

For decades, Balog has focused his camera lens on the relationship between people and nature, becoming a major voice in the climate change conversation, according to the CBF.

“The Human Element” follows Balog in a visually rich journey across the United States as he covers wildfires, hurricanes, sea level rise, a coal mining community, and our air supply.

The film shows how humans alter the basic elements of life — earth, air, water and fire—which in turn change human life.

“Upon arriving in Hampton Roads, I was surprised to see how vulnerable these communities are to the rapidly changing water boundary,” Balog said. “At the same time, I was encouraged and inspired by the region’s adaptation planning and willingness to tackle the problems of climate change and sea level rise head on. “

Doors open at 5 p.m. Advance registration is required and available at www.cbf.org/film, or by e-mail at rsvp@cbf.org, or phone at 757-622-1964.

Related Articles

MORE FROM AUTHOR