Tuesday, August 9, 2022

The Historic Preservation will receive grants. Here are the projects the money will be used for

Taken in the late 1950s this photo shows the small two room structure that once served as the Great Neck Community School for grades one-through-seven (Photo Courtesy of Edna Hawkins-Hendrix)
Taken in the late 1950s this photo shows the small two room structure that once served as the Great Neck Community School for grades one-through-seven (Photo Courtesy of Edna Hawkins-Hendrix)

VIRGINIA BEACH — The Virginia Beach Historic Preservation Commission has announced nine 2018 grant awards for research projects that will provide additional scholarship in a variety of subject areas for Virginia Beach history.

The Commission initiated the research grant program in 2016 to encourage scholarship about persons, places and events that are significant to the city’s history. This is the third round of grant awards.

The nine grants total $13,000 and were made to support the following research projects:

Research papers on:

  • Nansemond Indian reservation near Pungo and the “Indian Settlement” near Trant’s Point;
  • Origins and development of African-American communities in Princess Anne County/Virginia Beach, Part 2;
  • Life and influences of Josiah Phillips, leader of a loyalist insurrection here in 1777;
  • Development of Kempsville and sale of lots after its official designation as a town in 1783;
  • The 1781 skirmish at James plantation in Princess Anne County.

Others projects are:

  • Video production of oral history interviews of local residents related to the German prisoners of war stationed at Camp Ashby and out on work detail in Princess Anne County;
  • Production of a short film on the history of the Seatack/Virginia Beach Life Saving/Coast Guard Station, including oral history interviews;
  • Research, text development, production and installation of a historic roadside marker about Miles James, born a slave in Princess Anne County and a Medal of Honor recipient with the U.S. Colored Troops in 1864;
  • Video production of five oral history interviews of local residents related to the Seaview Beach and Amusement Park and addition of the interviews to the Seaview Beach website.
A map showing areas of African-American settlement that occurred in the decades after the Civil War (Map Courtesy of Dr. Joanne Lucas)
A map showing areas of African-American settlement that occurred in the decades after the Civil War (Map Courtesy of Joanne Lucas)

The Historic Preservation Commission is a City Council-appointed body that advises council members on issues related to historic preservation. They seek to preserve, protect and maintain the historic integrity of Virginia Beach and the former Princess Anne County through a program of advocacy and increased public awareness and involvement.

The commission generally meets the first Wednesday evening of the month, except July and August, at 2101 Parks Ave., suite 500.

Related Articles

MORE FROM AUTHOR