JCC Supes Allow Lease Amendment for Proposed WISC Pool

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The two acres in blue is the proposed location of a pool at the Williamsburg Indoor Sports Complex. (Image courtesy of JCC)
The two acres in blue is the proposed location of a pool at the Williamsburg Indoor Sports Complex. (Image courtesy of James City County)

In a unanimous vote Tuesday night, the James City County Board of Supervisors authorized County Administrator Bryan Hill to amend the existing lease at the Williamsburg Indoor Sports Complex so a pool can be built.

The pool would be built on 2 acres of undeveloped land adjacent to the sports complex. John Carnifax, director of parks and recreation for James City County, said the WISC is tentatively planning to build a 25-meter by 25-yard pool so it can meet the requirements of the Virginia High School League and youth competitive swim organizations.

The project, which was found by the JCC Planning Commission to be consistent with the county’s master plan, is still in the design phase, Carnifax said.

In exchange for the additional land, the WISC has agreed to a 66 percent increase in the existing lease payment, free pool time for the three WJCC high school swim team practices and a 50 percent increase in the required scholarship amount, he said.

The area’s three competitive youth swim programs will be able to rent lanes and the high school teams will be able to host home meets at the pool, something they have not been able to do locally since standards for meet pools changed 10 years ago, Carnifax said.

“This sounds like a very good opportunity to partner with the folks at WISC and provide services to our high schools and the competitive teams that are out there,” said Vice Chairman John McGlennon (Roberts).

Supervisor Ruth Larson (Berkeley), whose daughter Abby is a state championship swimmer, commended the WISC for “stepping in on much-needed pool space” but did not accept this proposal as the solution to the county’s aquatic facility needs.

“I think we need to keep in mind that’s not a long-term solution to the needs we may have in the future,” Larson said.