W&M Renames Residence Halls for Key African American Figures

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The Jamestown Residences will now be named Hardy Hall and Lemon Hall in honor of two key African American figures in the College of William & Mary's history. (W&M)
The Jamestown Residences will now be named Hardy Hall and Lemon Hall in honor of two key African American figures in the College of William & Mary’s history. (W&M)

The College of William & Mary is planning to implement several recommendations of a race relations task force, beginning with the renaming of two residence halls for key African American figures in the college’s history.

The Jamestown Residences, which border Jamestown Road, will now be named Hardy Hall and Lemon Hall following unanimous approval of a resolution by the William & Mary Board of Visitors.

Hardy Hall is named for the late Carroll Hardy, an administrator in student affairs during the 1980s and 1990s who is remembered as “a tireless advocate for diversity at [William & Mary] and improving the campus experience for students of color,” according to a news release.

Lemon Hall is named for an enslaved man owned by the college in the late 18th century. He is also the namesake of the university’s Lemon Project, which encourages scholarship on the relationship between African Americans and the college throughout the school’s 300-year history.

“Building names have meaning. It was long past time for African-Americans to be among those whose names grace major buildings on our campus,” said President Taylor Reveley in a statement. “It will be quite wonderful to have Lemon Hall and Hardy Hall in our midst.”

The Task Force on Race and Race Relations, led by Chief Diversity Officer Chon Glover, conducted a comprehensive review of race relations beginning in March 2015 and submitted 51 recommendations, including 10 prioritized recommendations, to Reveley at the end of March.

“The task force was an extraordinarily dedicated group of people and we had a really tough task,” Glover said in a statement. “This is a work in progress and this is just the beginning.”

The recommendations Reveley will act upon immediately include investing $500,000 in Fiscal 2017 toward recruiting diverse faculty members and hiring an external consultant will help the college better understand the concerns of African American employees, according to the news release.

The task force report is now available online along with answers to frequently asked questions.