In Supes Bid, Sadler Aims to Be Voice for Citizens, Alter Public Comment Format is your source for free news and information in Williamsburg, James City & York Counties.

Sue Sadler 2015Sue Sadler may be best known in the James City County board room for her regular public comments.

She has frequently faced the dais to talk about a range of issues, such as her stance on property rights or her concern county policies are being negatively affected by a United Nations sustainable development action plan called Agenda 21.

In response to those who may be critical of her public comments, Sadler said her goal in speaking is to make sure local elected officials represent residents in any decision that could affect them.

As the prospective Stonehouse representative on the Board of Supervisors, Sadler said she could speak more powerfully for her neighbors and their needs.

“I do listen to what the citizens say,” Sadler said. “I’ve been listening to citizens talk about how they’re tired of the drama and games that go on locally and they want to be treated with more respect and I think that’s something I can bring to the board in a more collaborative manner.”

Stonehouse District Race

Click here to learn more about Sadler’s opponent, incumbent Jim Kennedy.

Sadler, 60, a retired hairstylist, moved to the Stonehouse community in 2003. Originally from York County and a graduate of York High School, Sadler said she lived throughout the country before returning to the Historic Triangle to be near her family.

She said she decided to run for the Board of Supervisors because she believes the county is on track to be “very unaffordable” in the future, noting her belief the property tax rate increase could negatively affect families living on fixed incomes.

“I thought it’s just time to for me to take this next step, to be able to be a voice to represent those citizens in those specific areas,” Sadler said.

She is challenging incumbent Stonehouse representative Jim Kennedy for the seat.

If elected, Sadler said her priorities include creating a strategic plan and a public facilities master plan, promoting transparency with help from tools like an online checkbook and restoring the public comment period to a format that makes citizens feel like they can raise concerns without being disrespected.

“The citizens, in my opinion, should have the last word,” Sadler said. “If something is said or has been voted upon, they should have that opportunity to come back and voice their opinion about that. As it stands now, you can only speak once.”

She said she would propose a vote to repeal the property tax rate increase and call for cutting “red tape” that is discouraging businesses to stay in the county and contribute to the tax base.

As a leader, Sadler said she encourages people to use their talents and loves to see people excel when using their gifts toward a team effort.

“I think working together is so critically important and I think that’s something I can bring to the table,” Sadler said.

While she asserted Kennedy’s campaign is “about vitriol, not the issues,” she said her campaign is about truth.

“It’s about honesty, it’s about integrity and listening to the citizens,” Sadler said.